Breaking up etiquette dating

(I doubt anyone will kick you out for breaking of these rules) but it’s kind of the same feeling as if you phone went off when you were sitting in that one class you hated.

No one really cares (too much), but it is still embarrassing.

[For more on Mannar Mode in Japan, click here] With my phone, I only have to hold down the center button for 3 seconds before it switches into “manner mode.” While trains do have a “priority seating” area, many people who qualify for “priority seating” choose to use the regular seats. Perhaps they are worried about being shown up by an older (or more handicapped) patron or the “priority seating” area is too far of a walk.

Needless to say, if you are sitting in the priority seats and someone who looks like they could be tired/damaged/carrying a child in any way, shape, or form, give them your seat. However, just even if you’re not sitting in the priority seats, you should still give up your seat. The unfortunate part is that half the time, they won’t take my seat right away.

Actually, that’s one of the first things anyone learns when they travel abroad. I originally wrote this post as a passive aggressive attempt to spread information on the internet, in hopes that at least a couple foreigners planning to visit Tokyo might read it.

Train etiquette in Japan really shouldn’t be that difficult. But I had the weirdest surreal moment in the world a couple months after I moved to Tokyo because a group of tourists were smoking on the train, which is probably the biggest “No-no” for train etiquette in Japan.

You will hear announcements every five minutes in both Japanese and English, reminding you to keep your phone on “Manner Mode.” Trains are typically pretty quiet, so a beeping or ringing cellphone is pretty obvious.

Manager: I want to apologize, humbly, deeply, and sincerely about the fork. You Since laws all over the world are rife with Values Dissonance, things that are misdemeanors or not even illegal in one country but treated as serious crimes in others can seem like this.It’s an old platitude, but it’s true: Breaking up is hard to do. Breaking up with someone you aren’t even really dating, technically. Particularly if you want to end things–after all, breaking up is, by most people’s definition, the act of ending a relationship.In today’s weird, disjointed, dating/hookup/whatever culture, it’s increasingly common to find yourself in some kind of nebulous non-relationship, whether it’s a friends with benefits situation or a “just hooking up and we don’t want to talk about what’s really happening” kind of deal. How can you break up with someone if you aren’t even officially dating them?It is so much of an understood social taboo that they don’t even have any “No smoking” signs (or vocal announcements) on the train, unlike their constant cellphone usage rules.In any case, I wanted to make a quick post about train etiquette in Tokyo, just because there are several people I would love to give this advice to, but don’t feel like burning that many bridges.

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